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    That wasp got plans to take care of butterflies. Kendrick can’t even comprehend.

    Fam, If I was that 🐛 I’d drink some tequila & kill it ,ain’t no freeloader messing with me. I’d throw it up 🤢and then pick it up

    I worked hard to be on this island & you come from turdvania to live with me? I’d grab that mf and choke it to death. “ you mf, how u get inside mah abdomen? Tryin ta live in paradise & you want to meta hr giger me like in alien film?” Keep choking it til you hear that gasp and have him say “whoooa mama , I messed with the wrong one🥵 “ I’d choke all 3. If I couldn’t choke it, I’d stomp walk all over it with all my pillar legs 🐛 🦵 . 😒all the future 🦋 baes be like “ that’s mah man I want to be with 😨”

    atlasobscura.com/articles/butterflies-parasitic-wasps-finland

    WHEN CATERPILLARS OF A BEAUTIFUL butterfly were introduced to the tiny island of Sottunga in the Åland archipelago, scientists hoped to study how the emerging butterflies would disperse across the landscape. But researchers did not realize that their introduction of the Glanville fritillary (Melitaea cinxia) would lead to the emergence of three other species, which sprang out of the butterfly like Russian dolls.

    Some of the caterpillars contained a parasitic wasp, Hyposoter horticola, which bursts from the caterpillar before it can pupate and become a butterfly. Living inside some of these small wasps was another even tinier, rarer parasite, a “hyperparasitoid” wasp known as Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. It kills the parasitic wasp around the same time as the wasp kills the caterpillar, and emerges 10 days later from the caterpillar’s carcass.

    Also along for the ride was a bacterium that is carried by the female H. horticola wasps and transmitted to her offspring. By some unknown mechanism, Wolbachia pipientis increases the susceptibility of the parasitic wasp to being taken over by the tiny parasitic wasp M. stigmaticus, which can only live on the H. horticola wasp.

    Perhaps most surprisingly, given that small island populations are notoriously vulnerable to extinction, all four species are still surviving on the island of about 10 square miles 30 years after the original introduction. A study of the genetics of the parasitic wasp and its bacterium has shown this survival to be all the more remarkable because the Glanville fritillary has experienced several population crashes on Sottunga.

    The Glanville fritillary population has had amazing crashes at times over the last 30 years and we were expecting there to be very low genetic diversity in the years following those crashes,” says Anne Duplouy of the University of Helsinki, and lead author of the study. “But this butterfly somehow seems to recover from isolated population crashes, and the genetic diversity in Åland is still impressively high, despite all the bottlenecks the butterfly has been through.”

    The parasites may have survived on the island by virtue of their superior flying skills. Unlike many butterflies, the Glanville fritillary is a poor disperser and individuals living naturally on neighboring islands cannot fly more than about 4.3 miles across open water to Sottunga to top up this population.

    But the tiny parasitic wasp H. horticola appears to have been able to fly or at least to be lifted by strong winds to move between islands on the Åland archipelago, an autonomous region of Finland where Swedish is the official language. Since H. horticola was accidentally introduced on to Sottunga, the wasp has been discovered on other islands to the north, where it was previously not recorded. These individuals show similar genotypes to Sottunga, suggesting they originated from the wasps accidentally introduced to that island.

    Duplouy says the study, which is published in Molecular Ecology, could serve as a warning to projects seeking to reintroduce or restore rare species, showing how easily other organisms—or pathogens—can be inadvertently released alongside the target species.

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    2 replies

    Ratio

  • musbedatreeman

    Ratio

    🥶

  • i love ur threads man

  • musbedatreeman

    Ratio

  • you truly got a way with words

  • you called ?

  • ·
    2 replies

    OP you’re unique

  • LB Birdie

    OP you’re unique

  • LB Birdie

    OP you’re unique

    we gonna need unique because i tell you what -

    first the microwasps then it’s the hyenas trying to eat ya butthole & not the jhene way. i’m talking serbian horror black market underground dvd (could be real footage or not- (we don’t know)

    people screaming on the street running 🏃‍♂️ from hyenas 🐺. you gonna need that unique person to stop that

    ima grab that hyena scruff ( probably take the leader to show dominance) on the back while he’s running and do a quick side toss into the windows of the nearest cafe shop. have some latte ☕️ on me , hy-guy😒

  • This kinda disgusting they have multiple wasps inside them putting me off my food

  • AudioConsulting

    we gonna need unique because i tell you what -

    first the microwasps then it’s the hyenas trying to eat ya butthole & not the jhene way. i’m talking serbian horror black market underground dvd (could be real footage or not- (we don’t know)

    people screaming on the street running 🏃‍♂️ from hyenas 🐺. you gonna need that unique person to stop that

    ima grab that hyena scruff ( probably take the leader to show dominance) on the back while he’s running and do a quick side toss into the windows of the nearest cafe shop. have some latte ☕️ on me , hy-guy😒

    Free gucci

  • Let’s not ignore that op said he’ll choke on all 3

  • But I love what op does so ima ignore it

  • Bro imagine

    Like f*** IBS nigga got 3 different wasp species in his s***

    Bro I can't rn

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    1 reply

    tldr

  • ·
    1 reply
    BG

    tldr

    parasite grows a wasp inside a caterpillar but it looks like a butterfly i guess, i think its 2 different bugs not a caterpillar turning into a butterfly

  • they look cool

  • worldpeace

    parasite grows a wasp inside a caterpillar but it looks like a butterfly i guess, i think its 2 different bugs not a caterpillar turning into a butterfly

    crazy

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