Reply
  • title sucks I'm sorry

    But let me explain

    I was watching this very interesting video about how to live a joyful life and the point was basically that we cannot trust our instincts when it comes to pleasure and free time and that to live a happy fulfilling life we have make a list of things that put us in that flow state of focus and we should purse doing challenging things we love

    Basically: You'll feel 10x better if you go play BBall (if you love bball) with someone, than if you stay home and eat chips while watching Netflix even tho watching netflix feels freeing and feels like something we so desperately want

    So I'm looking for books that put a mirror in front of you and tell you: "I know you think you want that BigMac but your mind is fooling you and you will feel better if you eat that apple rn" or "I know you think watching netflix rn would feel so sooo good but you'll feel better if you go on a bike ride rn"

    Anyone?

  • Siddartha by Hermann Hesse is exactly what you鈥檙e looking for

  • Meditations

    /thread

  • Beyond Good and Evil

  • rano 馃嚙馃嚪
    Jul 9
    1 reply

    You describing The Death of Ivan Ilyich





  • Jul 14
    1 reply
    rano

    You describing The Death of Ivan Ilyich

    Liking this one so far, style really reminds me of Citizen Kane

  • Jul 18
    edited

    Sirach - It's a really good read. Lots of depth and some good laughs. It really goes in depth about human nature, behavioral patterns etc. One of those books I can't put down and gain new insight with every read.

    Proverbs - 30 chapters, can read one a day and reflect on each for that month.

    Ecclesiastes - 12 Chapters but it's a book to return to annually if not more.

    If you're really up for better learning, you can cite each book and reference them together. You'll learn more about the full message that way. The same way we write essays via citing sources is the same way to approach these types of in depth studies.

  • Jul 18
    1 reply

    Bro suggesting biblical books

  • Smuchita

    Liking this one so far, style really reminds me of Citizen Kane

    Tolstoy鈥檚 best, imo.

  • the secret by rhonda byrne. it's about the law of attraction and that affects behavior imo

  • In

  • Dope thread.

    Coercion by Douglas Rushkoff. Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus is a good one too. Any Rushkoff book really

    Games People Play by Eric Berne

    Controversial but 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene

    Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior
    by Leonard Mlodinow

    Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman

    The Honeymoon Effect by Bruce Lipton

    Covert Persuasion by Kevin Hogan

  • Jul 21
    2 replies

    Tao Te Ching.

    Only book you need.

  • alliseearedemons

    Tao Te Ching.

    Only book you need.

    Great recommendation; I鈥檇 chime in with Ethics by Spinoza

  • Try to read Schopenhauer on desire and human suffering

    I would recommend you The World as Will and Representation

  • Aug 2

    Even in the best of circumstances, happiness is elusive. We seek pleasant sights, sounds, tastes, sensations, and moods. We satisfy our intellectual curiosity. We surround ourselves with friends and loved ones. We become connoisseurs of art, music, or food. But our pleasures are, by their very nature, fleeting. If we enjoy some great professional success, our feelings of accomplishment remain vivid and intoxicating for an hour, or perhaps a day, but then they subside. And the search goes on. The effort required to keep boredom and other unpleasantness at bay must continue, moment to moment.

    Ceaseless change is an unreliable basis for lasting fulfillment鈥 Is there a form of happiness beyond the mere repetition of pleasure and avoidance of pain?

    If there exists a source of psychological well-being that does not depend upon merely gratifying one鈥檚 desires, then it should be present even when all the usual sources of pleasure have been removed.

    We seem to do little more than lurch between wanting and not wanting. Thus, the question naturally arises: Is there more to life than this? Might it be possible to feel much better (in every sense of better) than one tends to feel? Is it possible to find lasting fulfillment despite the inevitability of change?

    Spiritual life begins with a suspicion that the answer to such questions could well be 鈥測es.鈥 And a true spiritual practitioner is someone who has discovered that it is possible to be at ease in the world for no reason, if only for a few moments at a time, and that such ease is synonymous with transcending the apparent boundaries of the self. Those who have never tasted such peace of mind might view these assertions as highly suspect. Nevertheless, it is a fact that a condition of selfless well-being is there to be glimpsed in each moment.

  • HFM

    Bro suggesting biblical books

    you reading em wrong read the ones for real niggas only
    lmao

    100.

  • alliseearedemons

    Tao Te Ching.

    Only book you need.

    real s***

  • Aug 15
    1 reply

    honestly it might seem wierd but go read Don Quioxote unabridged.

    that 1200 pg one.

  • Gonna check out some of these

  • Haven鈥檛 finished reading it but Thinking Fast and Slow

  • One last sparkle to follow

  • Sep 6
    1 reply
    RX CaliKhalElCalib

    honestly it might seem wierd but go read Don Quioxote unabridged.

    that 1200 pg one.

    I should pick that one up again, I got an old copy from the 80s I read about halfway through

  • Malakas

    I should pick that one up again, I got an old copy from the 80s I read about halfway through

    I'm write on the second part where they bout to glow up. it's a classic forreal

Write a reply...|