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  • Updated Dec 16, 2020

    Do you rearrange your room every other week at 2 in the morning? Fantasize about what furniture, rugs, tapestry, paintings, ornaments, posters you would put in your home? Just like to look at cool buildings, inside and out? Well then welcome to this thread.

    I'd like this thread to be equal parts showcasing creative feats of both interior design and architectural design and discussion of what that means to you. Perhaps every week or once in a while I'll post about specific designers, sets, and/or design pieces that deserve to be shown to the people.

    —————————————————

    Recommended reading (courtesy of @Mastazob) :

    • THE EYES OF THE SKIN - Pallasmaa
    • In Praise of Shadows - Tanizaki
    • Citizens of No Place - Jimenez Lai
    • Learning From Las Vegas - Venturi & Denise Scott Brown
    • Thinking Architecture - Peter Zumthor
    • S, M, L, XL - Koolhaas
    • Delirious New York - Koolhaas
    • The Good Life - Inaki Abalos
    • Why Do Architects Wear Black?
    • Radically Simple - Francis Kéré
    • Inside Utopia: Visionary Interiors and Futuristic Homes
    • Atlas of Forms The Architecture of The City - Aldo Rossi
    • Non-Referential Architecture - Olgiati

    —————————————————

    Looking to buy some furniture? Try this link and find some auctions near you! (courtesy of @Rool) :


    Like an endless library stretching beyond the horizon, deciding on any one architect or interior designer seems like a futile point. Each one has their own ethos, and are all worth finding more about. So I'll take my time and find the ones I like.

    On this installment, we head to the west coast. A historically symbolic land of experimentation, a plethora of advancements in architecture sprung about here in the 20th century. Taking stage among the many famous Southern California master architects today is Ray Kappe.

    4) SoCal Warmth

    Ray Kappe's story starts in 1951, graduating from UC Berkeley and finding employment at the San Francisco firm Ashen + Allen and with LA architect Carl Maston. Carrying with him the dual ideas of open space and angular lines, Kappe sought to tap in to the architecture boom of post-WWII America. Finishing his apprenticeship, Kappe founded his own practice in Brentwood, CA and got to work on building houses; in about 10 years Kappe had planned and built 50 houses.


    -The Meyer House, 1961


    -The Phineas Kappe House, 1956


    -The Eric Lowens House, 1957

    An ever evolving designer, Kappe spent the decade trying new techniques, experimenting with floor plans, materials, and interior design. Many believe these endeavors culminated in 1968 with his magnum opus, his own house, the Kappe House.

    Working with the land instead of against it, Kappe offers a fluid perspective on the relationship between man made structures and the nature it rests on. Tiptoeing around established fauna, working with instead of against the rock beneath it, Kappe's fervent denial of being boxed in as just a Modernist architect pushed the boundaries of the status quo of design at the time.

    In 1972, Kappe, his wife, and several of his colleagues left their tenure with the California Polytechnic State University at Pomona to create their own institution, the Southern California Institute of Architecture. Still a highly respected institution 50 years later, Kappe acted as director until 1978.


    "I've always sought out the

    edges, the views, and a feeling

    of expansiveness."

                                                                                             ### -Ray Kappe

    Ray continued to work well into retirement, commissioning works and even renovating houses from days past. In 2013 he was awarded the L.A. Architectural Lifetime Achievement Award for his multi-decade contribution to design and education. He passed in November of 2019. Below are more examples of the works of a man wholly engrossed in his work till the end. Rest in Peace.


    -Howard Waymire House, 1958


    -The Leon and Helen Barsha House, 1961


    -The Stanley and Marjorie Meyer Residence, 1961


    -The Leon-Gould Jacobson House, 1968


    Sources:
    Los Angeles Daily News
    AIALosAngeles
    PlantPrefab
    Kappe Architects
    ArchDaily
    US Modernist
    LA Times


    Hey yall. Thanks for reading all these posts I make. Sorry for the delay, a nigga finally out of school . Expect more otw!
    --- 3Dots

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply

    @gnarlynasty
    @Moka_Beans
    @Vox

    @ -ing yall cuz of my post in the other fashion thread.

  • Oct 25, 2020

    Good looks
    Killed the OP, can't wait to see what you do with this

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply
    3Dots

    @gnarlynasty
    @Moka_Beans
    @Vox

    @ -ing yall cuz of my post in the other fashion thread.

    Dude,I have an interior design book that I’ve been looking threw that’ll contribute a lot to this thread

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply

    Never been more in

  • Oct 25, 2020

    There's just something about that 60's design that makes me feel cozy and sophisticated.

    And it makes since, says show runner Matthew Weiner, "The first season of Mad Men takes place in 1960, when it was part of American culture to be educated, to be cultured, to be intellectual, to have taste."

  • Oct 25, 2020

    That’s it I’m starting mad men again when I’m done with sopranos

  • Oct 25, 2020

    That Don Draper NYC Apartment

  • Oct 25, 2020
    MONSTERX

    Never been more in

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    2 replies

    I got some fire s*** on my twitter but i go back and forth between these

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply
    gnarlynasty

    Dude,I have an interior design book that I’ve been looking threw that’ll contribute a lot to this thread

    Yessir I have one too called Case Study Houses that Ill add in too. Cant wait to see whats in your book

  • Oct 25, 2020


    Rick Owens' apartment in Venice, Italy

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply
    3Dots
    · edited
    Do you rearrange your room every other week at 2 in the morning? Fantasize about what furniture, rugs, tapestry, paintings, ornaments, posters you would put in your home? Just like to look at cool buildings, inside and out? Well then welcome to this thread.I'd like this thread to be equal parts showcasing creative feats of both interior design and architectural design and discussion of what that means to you. Perhaps every week or once in a while I'll post about specific designers, sets, and/or design pieces that deserve to be shown to the people.

    —————————————————

    Recommended reading (courtesy of @Mastazob) :
    • THE EYES OF THE SKIN - Pallasmaa
    • In Praise of Shadows - Tanizaki
    • Citizens of No Place - Jimenez Lai
    • Learning From Las Vegas - Venturi & Denise Scott Brown
    • Thinking Architecture - Peter Zumthor
    • S, M, L, XL - Koolhaas
    • Delirious New York - Koolhaas
    • The Good Life - Inaki Abalos
    • Why Do Architects Wear Black?
    • Radically Simple - Francis Kéré
    • Inside Utopia: Visionary Interiors and Futuristic Homes
    • Atlas of Forms The Architecture of The City - Aldo Rossi
    • Non-Referential Architecture - Olgiati

    —————————————————

    Looking to buy some furniture? Try this link and find some auctions near you! (courtesy of @Rool) :
    • https://www.auctionzip.com/

    Like an endless library stretching beyond the horizon, deciding on any one architect or interior designer seems like a futile point. Each one has their own ethos, and are all worth finding more about. So I'll take my time and find the ones I like.

    On this installment, we head to the west coast. A historically symbolic land of experimentation, a plethora of advancements in architecture sprung about here in the 20th century. Taking stage among the many famous Southern California master architects today is Ray Kappe.

    4) SoCal Warmth

    Ray Kappe's story starts in 1951, graduating from UC Berkeley and finding employment at the San Francisco firm Ashen + Allen and with LA architect Carl Maston. Carrying with him the dual ideas of open space and angular lines, Kappe sought to tap in to the architecture boom of post-WWII America. Finishing his apprenticeship, Kappe founded his own practice in Brentwood, CA and got to work on building houses; in about 10 years Kappe had planned and built 50 houses.


    -The Meyer House, 1961


    -The Phineas Kappe House, 1956


    -The Eric Lowens House, 1957

    An ever evolving designer, Kappe spent the decade trying new techniques, experimenting with floor plans, materials, and interior design. Many believe these endeavors culminated in 1968 with his magnum opus, his own house, the Kappe House.

    Working with the land instead of against it, Kappe offers a fluid perspective on the relationship between man made structures and the nature it rests on. Tiptoeing around established fauna, working with instead of against the rock beneath it, Kappe's fervent denial of being boxed in as just a Modernist architect pushed the boundaries of the status quo of design at the time.

    In 1972, Kappe, his wife, and several of his colleagues left their tenure with the California Polytechnic State University at Pomona to create their own institution, the Southern California Institute of Architecture. Still a highly respected institution 50 years later, Kappe acted as director until 1978.


    "I've always sought out theedges, the views, and a feelingof expansiveness."
                                                                                             ### -Ray Kappe

    Ray continued to work well into retirement, commissioning works and even renovating houses from days past. In 2013 he was awarded the L.A. Architectural Lifetime Achievement Award for his multi-decade contribution to design and education. He passed in November of 2019. Below are more examples of the works of a man wholly engrossed in his work till the end. Rest in Peace.

    !https://youtu.be/7hUoMr1SgGM


    -Howard Waymire House, 1958


    -The Leon and Helen Barsha House, 1961


    -The Stanley and Marjorie Meyer Residence, 1961


    -The Leon-Gould Jacobson House, 1968


    Sources:
    Los Angeles Daily News
    AIALosAngeles
    PlantPrefab
    Kappe Architects
    ArchDaily
    US Modernist
    LA Times


    Hey yall. Thanks for reading all these posts I make. Sorry for the delay, a nigga finally out of school . Expect more otw!
    --- 3Dots

    You structured this jawn hella nice it feel like I’m reading an article

  • Oct 25, 2020

    Thread already going!!

  • Oct 25, 2020
    MONSTERX

    I got some fire s*** on my twitter but i go back and forth between these

    Lmfaoo unironically tho i dont f*** with most modern architecture. Too much glass and steel

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    edited
    Moka

    You structured this jawn hella nice it feel like I’m reading an article

    Thank you brutha.

    I like to write and a big part of expression is how you get yourself across. I take inspo from threads by safe and brave too they make clean threads.

  • YERRRRRRRR

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply
    3Dots

    Yessir I have one too called Case Study Houses that Ill add in too. Cant wait to see whats in your book

    Here’s some photos from the book,it tries to go through every aspect of home interior design like kitchens,bathrooms,living rooms,home offices etc. The pics in this are fire,I’ll post more soon cause I chose these randomly lol.

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply
    gnarlynasty

    Here’s some photos from the book,it tries to go through every aspect of home interior design like kitchens,bathrooms,living rooms,home offices etc. The pics in this are fire,I’ll post more soon cause I chose these randomly lol.

    Nice! Thanks for contributing

    A lot of white I see haha. On one hand I like it, it makes the room for clearer and bright but it also reminds me of a hospital

    Love to see other parts of the house!

  • Oct 25, 2020
    3Dots

    Nice! Thanks for contributing

    A lot of white I see haha. On one hand I like it, it makes the room for clearer and bright but it also reminds me of a hospital

    Love to see other parts of the house!

    Yea,here’s some more pics,definitely a lot of clean white rooms in the book. It’s cool looking but it’ll definitely be weird to live with so much whiteness lol

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    edited
    ·
    1 reply
  • Oct 25, 2020
    Replica
    · edited


    https://web.stanford.edu/~kimth/www-mit/mas110/paper1/





    It says not found :(

  • wonderful thread
    peace to you, OP

  • Oct 25, 2020
    ·
    1 reply

    Stahl House. Woods Drive, West Hollywood, USA. Pierre Koenig


    Unbuilt Concept. A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons

  • Oct 25, 2020

    in

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