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  • Oct 23
    edited

    The Russian Literature(袪褍褋褋泻邪褟 谢懈褌械褉邪褌褍褉邪) thread.

    Below a list of (classic)Russian authors:

    Mikhail Bulgakov - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Bulgakov
    Anton Chekhov - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Chekhov
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fyodor_Dostoevsky
    Nikolai Gogol - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolai_Gogol
    Ivan Goncharov - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Goncharov
    Mikhail Lermontov - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Lermontov
    Vladimir Nabokov - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Nabokov
    Boris Pasternak - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Pasternak
    Alexander Pushkin - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Pushkin
    Lev Tolstoy - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Tolstoy
    Ivan Turgenev - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Turgenev

  • OP
    Oct 23

    If you want to discuss Dostoyevsky specifically, there is already a great thread for it: ktt2.com/fyodor-dostoevsky-thread-32512441

  • OP
    Oct 23
    edited

    Let me know which books you read from Russian authors and what you think of it and what you are planning to read

  • in, only familiar with dosto and tolstoj. meant to explore more of them lately

  • Oct 23

    Pushkin's Mozart and Salieri is my favorite play ever written. Little Tragedies as a whole is my favorite book ever too

  • Bought Childhood,Boyhood and Youth by Tolstoy and Winter Notes on Summer Impressions by Dostoevsky but not sure if I'm in the mood for them atm, reading some Hesse rn

  • Oct 23
    1 reply

    Fathers and Sons by Turgenev is great I finished it in a weekend

    A timeless depiction of generational conflict during social upheaval, it vividly portrays the clash between the older Russian aristocracy and the youthful radicalism that foreshadowed the revolution to come鈥攁nd offers modern-day readers much to reflect upon as they look around at their own tumultuous, ever changing world.

  • In

  • OP
    Oct 23
    1 reply

    Haven't read anything from Nabokov.
    I started with Lolita but gave up after a few pages. Not really sure why but something put me off.

    Did you read Pale Fire in Russian or English?
    Thought it was written in English by Nabokov, correct?

  • OP
    Oct 23
    maxx

    Fathers and Sons by Turgenev is great I finished it in a weekend

    A timeless depiction of generational conflict during social upheaval, it vividly portrays the clash between the older Russian aristocracy and the youthful radicalism that foreshadowed the revolution to come鈥攁nd offers modern-day readers much to reflect upon as they look around at their own tumultuous, ever changing world.

    Definitely agree.

    Really groot book on the subjects you mentioned and nihilism.

  • Oct 23
    edited
    KFA

    Haven't read anything from Nabokov.
    I started with Lolita but gave up after a few pages. Not really sure why but something put me off.

    Did you read Pale Fire in Russian or English?
    Thought it was written in English by Nabokov, correct?

    lolita subject matter alone turns me off lmao.
    when i'll check nabokov i'll pretend this book doesn't exist

  • i read The Death of Ivan Ilyich i thought it was cool

  • Nov 10
    1 reply

    Master and the Margarita a classic.

  • OP
    Nov 11
    giovanni

    Master and the Margarita a classic.

    I only read Dog's heart by Bulgakov and I liked the story but not his writing.

    How difficult is Master and Margarita to follow?

  • in

  • Wizzling 馃
    Nov 28
    1 reply

    finished notes from the underground yesterday

  • OP
    Nov 28
    1 reply
    Wizzling

    finished notes from the underground yesterday

    What did you think of it?

    Would love to hear it

  • Wizzling 馃
    Nov 28
    1 reply
    KFA

    What did you think of it?

    Would love to hear it

    odd that鈥檚 probably the best way i can sum it up for me

    Like the man鈥檚 whole treatment of Liza and how he tries to suck up to the general just made me disdain him but that鈥檚 the point lol, especially with his lashing out in Liza it seemed to me less likely he was lashing out at Liza but more at him self but was directing it to her.

    the beginning i was confused like who鈥檚 he talking to about this argument about rationality i guess i got the point it to introduce us to the characters philosophy.

    I鈥檝e read crime and punishment didn鈥檛 finish it tho, only got to the crime part but this book was the first one i finished by Doestivisky, gonna read the double next

  • OP
    Nov 28
    1 reply
    Wizzling

    odd that鈥檚 probably the best way i can sum it up for me

    Like the man鈥檚 whole treatment of Liza and how he tries to suck up to the general just made me disdain him but that鈥檚 the point lol, especially with his lashing out in Liza it seemed to me less likely he was lashing out at Liza but more at him self but was directing it to her.

    the beginning i was confused like who鈥檚 he talking to about this argument about rationality i guess i got the point it to introduce us to the characters philosophy.

    I鈥檝e read crime and punishment didn鈥檛 finish it tho, only got to the crime part but this book was the first one i finished by Doestivisky, gonna read the double next

    I feel you, the first part can be intimidating. I still don鈥檛 fully get it, read it 2 times and planning to reread it soon. Need to really take my time with it for the reread.

    I read the double but that was another confusing one if you ask me. Interesting read tho

  • Wizzling 馃
    Nov 28
    KFA

    I feel you, the first part can be intimidating. I still don鈥檛 fully get it, read it 2 times and planning to reread it soon. Need to really take my time with it for the reread.

    I read the double but that was another confusing one if you ask me. Interesting read tho

    for the philosophical part i guess it would help to know Russia at that time, i think D was arguing against the rational liberals at the time arguing that humans can create the perfect society rationally cause man was a rational being , which D was against since he was in touch with the common people at the time which many of the russian liberals were farly disconnected from and see how irrational and neurotic they were, which he shows with the opening argument and the man鈥檚 whole story.

  • Read The Kiss by Chekhov a while back and I've always liked Russian lit,

    Read a couple books for classes in uni, Fathers and Sons, Cherry Orchard and Uncle Vanya. Ngl found Vanya the hardest to get into

  • OP
    1 reply

    Not sure what big Russian novel I will read next.

    War & Peace or The Brothers Karamazov?

  • KFA

    Not sure what big Russian novel I will read next.

    War & Peace or The Brothers Karamazov?

    Karamazov got me in an epiphany fam, definitely that