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  • Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Фёдор Михайлович Достоевский, Fyódor Mikháylovich Dostoyévskiy, 11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881), sometimes transliterated as Dostoyevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, and journalist. Dostoevsky's literary works explore the human condition in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmospheres of 19th-century Russia, and engage with a variety of philosophical and religious themes.

    MOST NOTABLE WORK

    NOVELS

    (1846) Poor Folk (novella)
    (1846) The Double (novella)
    (1847) The Landlady (novella)
    (1849) Netochka Nezvanova (unfinished)
    (1859) Uncle's Dream (novella)
    (1859) The Village of Stepanchikovo
    (1861) Humiliated and Insulted
    (1862) The House of the Dead
    (1864) Notes from Underground
    (1866) Crime and Punishment
    (1867) The Gambler (novella)
    (1869) The Idiot
    (1870) The Eternal Husband (novella)
    (1872) Demons
    (1875) The Adolescent
    (1880) The Brothers Karamazov

    MOST NOTABLE SHORT STORIES AND ESSAY COLLECTIONS

    (1848) White Nights
    (1848) The Honest Thief
    (1848) The Christmas Tree and a Wedding
    (1876) The Peasant Marey
    (1876) A Gentle Creature
    (1878) The Dream of a Ridiculous Man
    (1873-1881) A Writer's Diary

  • Feb 5
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    1 reply

    The GOAT of Literature

    For me: Brothers K > C&P > Notes from Underground > The Idiot > Demons > The Gambler

    White Nights is his best short story. The Meek One (A Gentle Creature) honourable mention

  • I couldn't stop thinkin lately about a beautiful parallelism between Kanye and Ivan Karamazov. One released one of the most acclamed discography in history of music while through the other, Dostoyevski convey the peak of his prose such The Great Inquisitor.
    One got maniac rants while the other f\*\*\*s up his brother trial by talking about his schizophrenic experience.
    And God, what an incredible relationship they develop with The Most High!
    They both share a quirky orgy between madness, creativity and religion.

  • Just finished Crime and Punishment yesterday in as f***

  • Grenouille

    The GOAT of Literature

    For me: Brothers K > C&P > Notes from Underground > The Idiot > Demons > The Gambler

    White Nights is his best short story. The Meek One (A Gentle Creature) honourable mention

    For me Brothers K > Notes from the Underground > Idiot > C&P > The Gambler rest

  • Feb 5
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    1 reply

    I am a sick man....I am an angry man. I am an unattractive man. I think there is something wrong with my liver.

  • Feb 5
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    1 reply

    I’ve read Crime and Punishment and Brothers Karamazov so far, both were great but Brothers Karamazov especially was a really difficult one to read. I might just have gotten a s*** translation, who knows

  • Chad

    I am a sick man....I am an angry man. I am an unattractive man. I think there is something wrong with my liver.

  • White Nights captures unrequited love, loneliness, ennui, and regret, along with the interplay between them, so perfectly

  • Feb 6
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    2 replies
    Malakas

    I’ve read Crime and Punishment and Brothers Karamazov so far, both were great but Brothers Karamazov especially was a really difficult one to read. I might just have gotten a s*** translation, who knows

    Actually all of Dostevsky’s major works from C&P to Brothers K are supposed to be read in order of release.

    So C&P->The Idiot->Demons->Brothers K.

    There’s a thematic throughline within those novels and they get progressively more complex as they go along.

  • It’s such a shame that Kurosawa was never allowed to release his 4 hour cut of The Idiot and had to settle with the butchered version that was released.

  • CrimsonArk

    Actually all of Dostevsky’s major works from C&P to Brothers K are supposed to be read in order of release.

    So C&P->The Idiot->Demons->Brothers K.

    There’s a thematic throughline within those novels and they get progressively more complex as they go along.

    I definitely plan on rereading it at some point in the future, I’ve already reread C&P a handful of times as well. Might just have to look into his other books before I try Karamazov again

  • reddit.com/r/books/comments/734fhq/the_brothers_karamazov_wheres_the_sequel_spoilers

    Brothers Karamazov is alrealdy a masterpiece, not having a sequel is a great loss

  • Feb 6
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    1 reply

    ~200 pages into both crime and punishment and brothers karamazov
    50 pages into the idiot
    which should i finish first?

  • Feb 6
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    1 reply
    gregor samsa

    ~200 pages into both crime and punishment and brothers karamazov
    50 pages into the idiot
    which should i finish first?

    follow the release order like Crimson Ark suggested, also do you really read three books at the same time?!

  • the goat

  • Feb 12
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    1 reply
    Smuchepper

    follow the release order like Crimson Ark suggested, also do you really read three books at the same time?!

    bet he remembers absolutely nothing about any of those books after he finishes

  • Feb 14
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    1 reply

    I love me some Russian lit, but I’m gonna be honest, I don’t think I’m able to properly pronounce 2/3rds of the names I come across.

    Legit just think in my head when I’m reading “That one guy”.

  • maidenless deadpeg

    bet he remembers absolutely nothing about any of those books after he finishes

    The man who lies to himself and believes his own lie ceases to be able to distinguish truth within himself and in other men, ceasing to be able to tell truth he is no longer able
    To respect himself or others, losing that he is no longer able to love

  • CrimsonArk

    I love me some Russian lit, but I’m gonna be honest, I don’t think I’m able to properly pronounce 2/3rds of the names I come across.

    Legit just think in my head when I’m reading “That one guy”.

    Lmao, it is honestly the hardest part of Russian lit lmao

    It’s basically like this — first name; patronymic** (fathers name); surname.

    Ex, the protagonist of the Brothers K: Alexei Fyodorovich Karamazov

    Alexei is his first name, Fyodorvich is his patronymic, and Karamzov is his surname. To make it even more complicated, they often have nicknames and are referred to half the time by their real names and half the time by their nicknames. For instance, Alexei is often called Aloysha or Alyoshenka.

    ** the patronymic name has a slightly different ending if you are a female.
    For instance, in Crime and Punishment, Rodion’s patronymic as a male is ‘Romanovich’ whilst for his sister it is ‘Romanova’

  • Feb 15

    Finished crime and punishment recently

  • Feb 19
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    3 replies

    How does he compare to Tolstoy? Absolutely loved War and Peace when I didn’t think I would. Are 19th century Russian authors the goats?

  • Joesuff

    How does he compare to Tolstoy? Absolutely loved War and Peace when I didn’t think I would. Are 19th century Russian authors the goats?

    GOATS. Just read what you find and it'll be crack most probably

  • The goat. Demons next on my list

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